The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman

The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman
The Invisible Library

Rating: Thumbs Up

Pages: 329
by Genevieve Cogman


I received this book for free from in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.


Illuminae By Amie Kaufman And Jay Kristoff

Illuminae By Amie Kaufman And Jay Kristoff

Illuminae a tightly written novel told in an unusual way. It will appeal to those who love space adventures, suspense and sentient AIs.
The Dr. Genevieve Summerford Mystery series by Cuyler Overholt

The Dr. Genevieve Summerford Mystery series by Cuyler Overholt

Cuyler Overholt knowns how weave a multi-dimensional mysteries with fully realized relatable characters. Readers who enjoy stories involving strong women and fans of mysteries should definitely check out the Dr. Genevieve Summerford Mystery series.
The Traveler Chronicles by Dennis W. Green

The Traveler Chronicles by Dennis W. Green

Fans of mysteries and crime thrillers will enjoy how shifting realities breathes new life into these standard genres. I’ll just warn you to buckle up and prepare for a wild, humor-infused ride.
A Plague Of Zombies By Diana Gabaldon

A Plague Of Zombies By Diana Gabaldon

This short story was very disjointed. The mystery and it’s resolution were lack luster and underwhelming like the whole plot was forced together under the premise of zombies to fit some unidentified, unknown unifying topic

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

Outlander holds a dear spot in my heart and on my bookshelf. And while, Voyager, book 3 in the series, is still my absolute favorite, this is the book that started it all. It is a big book, but it is worth every minute of your first read or your fifth read. For me, it’s like coming home again each time I pick it up again.
Magruder’s Curiosity Cabinet By H.P. Wood

Magruder’s Curiosity Cabinet By H.P. Wood

Magruder’s Curiosity Cabinet is a character study. It is a different kind of historical fiction novel from that standpoint The characters drive the story. Be prepared to be delight to go on this journey of self-discovery. It's an adventure you won’t soon forget and one that you won't mind going on again.
Girl in Disguise by Greer Macallister

Girl in Disguise by Greer Macallister

Greer Macallister's takes a few scant details and introduces a new historical heroine to admire. Her compelling story gives strength and encouragement in the darkest known part of American history to date.
The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman

The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman

There’s a little bit of everything in The Invisible Library—mystery, magic, fae, vampires, werewolves, books and of course, DRAGONS. I can’t seem to resist decent books about libraries, fellow bookworms and dragons.
The Great Library Series by Rachel Caine

The Great Library Series by Rachel Caine

The Great Library Series is an excellent adventure that asks some deep questions about how the world does and should share knowledge.
Written In My Heart’s Own Blood By Diana Gabaldon

Written In My Heart’s Own Blood By Diana Gabaldon

With a plot that goes no where, recycled timelines (and dialogue) and an overwhelming amount of characters to follow, I was not satisfied with how this book was put together or how it all ended.
The Butterman Travel Series By P.K. Hrezo

The Butterman Travel Series By P.K. Hrezo

If you are looking for a lighter time travel novel with a bit of a steamy side and well-round, good-head-on-her-shoulders heroine, definitely check out the Butterman Time Travel series.
The Readers Of Broken Wheel Recommend By Katarina Bivald

The Readers Of Broken Wheel Recommend By Katarina Bivald

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend will appeal to a wide range of readers — bookworms and romances readers alike.
The Code Name Verity series By Elizabeth Wein

The Code Name Verity series By Elizabeth Wein

The Code Name Verity series is seared on my soul and my heart. Both books are a grand adventure story with heart and chutzpah. I look forward to seeing Maddie, Queenie and Rose again soon no matter how much their stories break by heart.

The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman

From now on, let it be known, that I am no longer searching for Narnia when I open doors. I am searching for the Library as invented by Genevieve Cogman in The Invisible Library series. This magic library exists between worlds and between times and contains more books than the most accomplished bookworm or book dragon could hope to acquire.The Invisible Library, book one in this debut series by Genevieve Cogman, is a setup book. The narrative is a bit heavy and there were points where I felt the action was dragging and other points I was a bit overwhelmed. But this is the first novel in a series and the world is complicated. It takes a bit to get settled in and get used to the rules. Cogman reveals many details about the universe, inside and outside of the Library including the Library’s own special magic that requires mastery of The Language. I was fascinated by the secrets of the library (apparently you don’t age when you are in the Library), however, there are hints throughout the novel that perhaps the Library isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

There’s a little bit of everything in The Invisible Library—mystery, magic, fae, vampires, werewolves, books and of course, DRAGONS. I am intrigued enough with the world of The Invisible Library to give book two, The Masked City, which releases soon a chance. I can’t seem to resist decent books about libraries, fellow bookworms and dragons.

She just wanted — had always wanted — a good book to read.”Genevieve Cogman, The Invisible Library

A version of this review also appeared in The GazetteRead it now.

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The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman
The Masked City

Rating: Thumbs Up

Pages: 340
by Genevieve Cogman


I received this book for free from in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

The Masked City by Genevieve Cogman

How lucky could a blogger get? I was happily approved for The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman which I enjoy quite a bit and then the publisher surprisingly approved me for book two, The Masked City, which I delayed reading for no good reason.

Where The Invisible Library fell short—lots of world building explanations that drug down the action bits—The Masked Citysoared. The Masked City doesn’t waste anytime jumping right into the action with Kai and Irene who are immediately swept up in dastardly Fae plot to start a war. Kai, Irene’s apprentice, is missing for most of the book and this allows Cogman to explore Irene’s character and motivations in a deeper fashion. Throughout the story, Irene is challenged and becomes quite resourceful in this latest installment in The Invisible Library series.

There are just two bits about this latest installment still niggling in the back of my head.

  1. In book one, I caught hints that the Library’s power was perhaps too powerful—that there was a bigger story behind the story. I was hoping Cogman would explore that a bit more in book two, but it was missing.
  2. Sometimes Cogman uses big words that are archaic. It is almost as if she is showing off her knowledge of the English language. I wouldn’t mind this so much if one of the Library characters, such as Irene, was using these words, but since it happens in the general text and not character dialogue or thoughts, it feels snooty.

Despite these two points, I did thoroughly enjoy Cogman’s romp through a magic-infused Venice with its gondolas, masks and conniving Fae. Irene is becoming a fleshed out strong female character who is starting understand her power and place in the world. And with the world building out of the way, The Masked City flies with action and adventure.

A version of this review also appeared in The GazetteRead it now.

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The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman
The Burning Page

Rating: Thumbs Up

Pages: 358
by Genevieve Cogman


I received this book for free from in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

The Burning Page by Genevieve Cogman

The Burning Page, book 3 in the series, takes us back to the alternate London where Irene and Kai are stationed after book two. That’s isn’t to say there is less action or that we aren’t learning about other alternates. In fact, Cogman takes us inside the inner workings of The Library itself and Kai and Irene journey to an alternate Russia.

Book three in this series is focused on Irene again with Kai and Vale playing supporting roles. Where book two was about Irene figuring out who she is as an individual, The Burning Page focuses on Irene the Librarian and Irene the Friend. She is dealing with moral decisions that affect The Library and its connection to the world at large. These decisions also force her to confront, at least in her head, her desire to have a romantic relationship. Will Irene focus on her career or her love life? It is a question many women, real and fictional, face. (Check out my review of Girl in Disguise!) And while I feel that romance isn’t necessary, some of the most humorous (and embarrassing) points in the books are men fawning over Irene in their own unique ways. Cogman plays the romantic tease quite well.

My pain points from book 2 (the hints at a bigger plot involving The Library and the archaic language) are no longer pain points. Alberich (Irene’s Moriarty) is back and dropping hints about The Library—bringing back into question The Library’s ideals and power. And since there is a hint of romance in the air, further questions are being raised about Irene’s parentage. Do I get a sense that book 4 might explore all of this further?

My favorite part about The Burning Page is that the series could be done and I would be completely happy with the ending. While there are hints of a larger story with Alberich, The Library and Irene’s parents, Cogman did an excellent job of wrapping up the story and leaving a satisfying conclusion. However, I have it on good authority that books 4 and 5 are in the works!

A version of this review also appeared in The GazetteRead it now.

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The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman
The Lost Plot

Rating: Thumbs Up

Pages: 376
by Genevieve Cogman


I received this book for free from in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.


Illuminae By Amie Kaufman And Jay Kristoff

Illuminae By Amie Kaufman And Jay Kristoff

Illuminae a tightly written novel told in an unusual way. It will appeal to those who love space adventures, suspense and sentient AIs.
The Dr. Genevieve Summerford Mystery series by Cuyler Overholt

The Dr. Genevieve Summerford Mystery series by Cuyler Overholt

Cuyler Overholt knowns how weave a multi-dimensional mysteries with fully realized relatable characters. Readers who enjoy stories involving strong women and fans of mysteries should definitely check out the Dr. Genevieve Summerford Mystery series.
The Traveler Chronicles by Dennis W. Green

The Traveler Chronicles by Dennis W. Green

Fans of mysteries and crime thrillers will enjoy how shifting realities breathes new life into these standard genres. I’ll just warn you to buckle up and prepare for a wild, humor-infused ride.
A Plague Of Zombies By Diana Gabaldon

A Plague Of Zombies By Diana Gabaldon

This short story was very disjointed. The mystery and it’s resolution were lack luster and underwhelming like the whole plot was forced together under the premise of zombies to fit some unidentified, unknown unifying topic

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

Outlander holds a dear spot in my heart and on my bookshelf. And while, Voyager, book 3 in the series, is still my absolute favorite, this is the book that started it all. It is a big book, but it is worth every minute of your first read or your fifth read. For me, it’s like coming home again each time I pick it up again.
Magruder’s Curiosity Cabinet By H.P. Wood

Magruder’s Curiosity Cabinet By H.P. Wood

Magruder’s Curiosity Cabinet is a character study. It is a different kind of historical fiction novel from that standpoint The characters drive the story. Be prepared to be delight to go on this journey of self-discovery. It's an adventure you won’t soon forget and one that you won't mind going on again.
Girl in Disguise by Greer Macallister

Girl in Disguise by Greer Macallister

Greer Macallister's takes a few scant details and introduces a new historical heroine to admire. Her compelling story gives strength and encouragement in the darkest known part of American history to date.
The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman

The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman

There’s a little bit of everything in The Invisible Library—mystery, magic, fae, vampires, werewolves, books and of course, DRAGONS. I can’t seem to resist decent books about libraries, fellow bookworms and dragons.
The Great Library Series by Rachel Caine

The Great Library Series by Rachel Caine

The Great Library Series is an excellent adventure that asks some deep questions about how the world does and should share knowledge.
Written In My Heart’s Own Blood By Diana Gabaldon

Written In My Heart’s Own Blood By Diana Gabaldon

With a plot that goes no where, recycled timelines (and dialogue) and an overwhelming amount of characters to follow, I was not satisfied with how this book was put together or how it all ended.
The Butterman Travel Series By P.K. Hrezo

The Butterman Travel Series By P.K. Hrezo

If you are looking for a lighter time travel novel with a bit of a steamy side and well-round, good-head-on-her-shoulders heroine, definitely check out the Butterman Time Travel series.
The Readers Of Broken Wheel Recommend By Katarina Bivald

The Readers Of Broken Wheel Recommend By Katarina Bivald

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend will appeal to a wide range of readers — bookworms and romances readers alike.
The Code Name Verity series By Elizabeth Wein

The Code Name Verity series By Elizabeth Wein

The Code Name Verity series is seared on my soul and my heart. Both books are a grand adventure story with heart and chutzpah. I look forward to seeing Maddie, Queenie and Rose again soon no matter how much their stories break by heart.

The Lost Plot by Genevieve Cogman

The Invisible Library series has finally hit its stride with The Lost Plot, book 4 of the series which was released earlier this year. Irene and Kai are finally coming into their own as Cogman becomes more familiar with their voices and the complex world she has built involving multiple versions of the known world with varying ranges of chaos (fae) and order (dragons).

The last three books in the series have mainly dealt with the fae and the chaos their involvement in the each of the worlds Cogman brings to light. The reader’s exposure to dragon has mainly been through Irene’s interactions with Kai and his family. The Lost Plot deals directly with dragon politics. Irene and Kai are caught between two dragons who are trying to gain a place of prominence. Much light is shed on how the dragons order their world and how the hierarchy of moving up in the ranks. Of course, this causes some friction as Irene and Kai need to keep a low profile because of their library duties as they try to prevent an alternate version of prohibition era Chicago from being torn to shreds.

Cogman litters the story with colorful characters and even Irene must take a more colorful role as famous female crime boss. Being the version of Chicago in The Lost Plot is set during prohibition, there are quite a few run-ins with suspicious police officers and rival crime bosses. The best tropes of the prohibition era shine throughout–there’s a daring escape from a speakeasy, an uneasy interrogation from the police and a quiet moll who’s more than what she seems.

The Lost Plot does veer away from the ongoing Alberich storyline present in the first three books. Does it seem like this mystery and rivalry has been put to bed? As a reader, I hope not. Since the whole series is an homage to Sherlock Holmes, Alberich is Irene’s Moriarity and a good villain is never truly dead. And even Irene seems to doubt that the battle fought in book 3 was the last.

Alberich might have known more, but Alberich was dead. Probably. Hopefully.”Genevieve Cogman, The Lost Plot

The Lost Plot could be read as a stand-alone novel. Irene and Kai work together on a singular mystery, solve it and are ready to move on to the next adventure. At the conclusion of the story, there seems to be little connection to the large plot strings present in books one, two and three.

The Lost Plot is full of action as any good story involving prohibition era America should. It almost moves too quickly. It’s over before you know it with Irene and Kai moving on to their next adventure which currently does not have a release date.

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